Colin Kaepernick sits during national anthem as a protest

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WestCoastJoe
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Tue Aug 30, 2016 6:02 pm

OK. Controversial subject. Try to be somewhat careful. I used to know a biker whose answer to every situation was: "Shoot 'em."

IMO ...

Kaepernick is entitled to express his point of view. Much validity in the charge that there is unfair treatment of "people of colour" in the USA. IMO ...

However, as some ex-pro athletes have said and asked, in so many words: Express yourself, but do you really want all your teammates and your organization to be subject to your views and all that comes with it? Different for Muhammad Ali, for example, as an individual boxer, to express his views, than a pro athlete on a team.

He does cause some trouble, possibly, for his organization. He does, perhaps, cause some difficulties for some teammates. Since he is part of a team, some might say expressing his views as he did, in that way, was somewhat of a selfish act.
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Also, apparently his birth mom, who gave him up for adoption, scolds him for sitting during the anthem. Someone else says she gave up the right to an opinion on him when she gave him up.
..............

We live in difficult, tricky times. Yup.

My views on this are fairly mild. What if I owned the team? Hmmmmm ... I would not like it. It is not his team. My attitude might be like that of John Wooden, of the UCLA Bruins. Bill Walton came back to camp with ultra long hair, and was determined to keep it that way. Wooden said, in so many words: I commend you, Bill, for your strong views, but you will have to play for another team, if you keep you hair in that fashion. Walton cut his hair. Not as serious as the anthem situation, but the response of ownership might be similar.
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South Pender
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Wed Aug 31, 2016 12:34 pm

The criticism of Kaepernick isn't that he didn't have the right to register a protest (he did), but rather centered around the forum in which he chose to do so. Many think that there were plenty of other forums in which to articulate the view that people of color are unfairly treated in the U.S. (and also incidentally in Canada; see the link at the end of my comments). He could have joined organizations falling under the umbrella of the U.S. Human Rights Network, or even the NAACP or Black Lives Matter to voice his quite-legitimate views, or perhaps started his own blog. I guess Kap thought that he could, perhaps, reach more people with his views this way, but to most (I think) the message was overshadowed by the medium.

The Star Spangled Banner is quite military thematically--particularly its first verse, which is the only one sung at events--and many see sitting for it as an affront to the millions of veterans, past and present, who have sacrificed for their country.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/comment ... anada.html

TheLionKing
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Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:15 pm

A total distraction that the 49ers don't need.

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KnowItAll
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Sun Sep 04, 2016 11:28 pm

if the damn media had just ignored him, it would be no issue. screw the media
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Dusty
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Mon Sep 05, 2016 6:53 am

TheLionKing wrote:A total distraction that the 49ers don't need.
I agree about Kap's protest being a distraction for the team, and also that he could have chosen many other formats for his protest. However, his choice has focussed a great deal of attention on this issue, but unfortunately, it also has focused a lot of attention on him, not the issue.

The other point is why the national anthem is sung at the start of sporting events. Quite frankly, I do not see the point of it. Even though I do not agree with the anthem singing at the Leo's games (it is not a sports events pitting representatives of a country against another, i.e. the Olympics), I do stand with hat off.

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WestCoastJoe
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Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:23 pm

So, this issue is taking on legs.

Trump gets involved. Of course. He never passes up an opportunity to throw some raw meat to his base.

Trump calls Jerry Jones a few times. Jones has his team stand for the anthem, after kneeling earlier, under threat of not playing otherwise.

The Pittsburgh Penguins are going to the White House.

Kaepernick is out of football.

I guess my views are evolving somewhat. Earlier I speculated that if I was the owner, I would want the players to stand, to show respect for the anthem.

But ...

Once Trump gets involved, and Jerry Jones makes his play, that kind of changes my thinking.

Let 'em protest. Does it show disrespect for the flag? Probably. Does the anthem of a country that perpetuates racism, that invades other countries, that supports drug companies causing addiction to prescribed drugs, that allows any number of guns to virtually anybody, that elects Trump, deserve respect? Hmmmm ... OK, sure. But should a player be allowed to protest by kneeling quietly? Sure.

Could Jones sit a player who protests? I think he could. Could he suspend him? Hmmm ... Not so sure about that. It would end up in a legal tussle.

Could the NFL make a rule disallowing kneeling during the anthem? I think so.

I would not mind seeing some Cowboys kneel during the anthem. I would not mind seeing Jones damage his team, by sitting or even suspending them.

Mike Pence? Trump's little lap dog? Pathetic PR play. Costly to taxpayers as well, methinks.

Just IMO ...

http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/01/us/nfl-pr ... index.html

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2737 ... =editorial
John Madden's Team Policies: Be on time. Pay attention. Play like hell on game day.

Jimmy Johnson's Game Keys: Protect the ball. Make plays.

Walter Payton's Advice to Kids: Play hard. Play fair. Have fun.

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WestCoastJoe
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Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:29 pm

Pix ...

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John Madden's Team Policies: Be on time. Pay attention. Play like hell on game day.

Jimmy Johnson's Game Keys: Protect the ball. Make plays.

Walter Payton's Advice to Kids: Play hard. Play fair. Have fun.

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WestCoastJoe
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Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:31 pm

Pix ...

imagesCAS503JL.jpg
mp.jpg
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John Madden's Team Policies: Be on time. Pay attention. Play like hell on game day.

Jimmy Johnson's Game Keys: Protect the ball. Make plays.

Walter Payton's Advice to Kids: Play hard. Play fair. Have fun.

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WestCoastJoe
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Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:36 pm

And this one.

I don't recall my reaction at the time, pro or con, but it did get my attention. As time went on I began to like it more and more. :thup:
1968 Olympics Black Power salute

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gold medalist Tommie Smith (center) and bronze medalist John Carlos (right) showing the raised fist on the podium after the 200 m race at the 1968 Summer Olympics; both wear Olympic Project for Human Rights badges. Peter Norman (silver medalist, left) from Australia also wears an OPHR badge in solidarity with Smith and Carlos.

The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute was a political demonstration conducted by African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City. After having won gold and bronze medals, respectively, in the 200-meter running event, they turned on the podium to face their flags, and to hear the American national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner". Each athlete raised a black-gloved fist, and kept them raised until the anthem had finished. In addition, Smith, Carlos, and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Smith stated that the gesture was not a "Black Power" salute, but a "human rights salute". The event is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympic Games.[1]
Smith had the idea and the gloves. Carlos liked the idea. But he had to wear the glove for the left hand.

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John Madden's Team Policies: Be on time. Pay attention. Play like hell on game day.

Jimmy Johnson's Game Keys: Protect the ball. Make plays.

Walter Payton's Advice to Kids: Play hard. Play fair. Have fun.

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